Killer Touch Points eat the meal kit value

The purpose of a company is to create value for customers. That is the theory at least. In practice, however, every company creates value for its customers, but mostly not without destroying some of the created value over time.

What counts in the end is the cocktail of joy and frustration. Is it too bitter? Is bitterness compensated for by sweetness? Do I want to repeat the experience I had with this cocktail? As long as the answer is ‘yes’, everything seems to be OK.

Let’s go back to the meal kit case. I buy a box with all the ingredients and a cooking guideline. (More details here)

The customer journey is simple; the box with the ingredients arrives, the content looks good, the preparation of the food goes well, the taste is impressive, the evening is enriched by the meal. But then you find that 70% of the volume of the box is cardboard and other material that needs to be disposed of!

Eating all the value!

Ok, the cool pads can be reused for other purposes, but after a while I have 50 of them and still haven’t found a second application for the winter months. I am now the largest producer of packaging waste in our building. It can be recycled, fair enough, but we now need an additional disposal container.

The providers of the meal kits have created five wonderful steps for adding value – delicious and pleasant little success stories, one after the other. But then the last step on the customer journey eats into the value created in ever larger bites. It becomes a killer touchpoint.[MH2] 

Unfortunately, this killer touchpoint is also cumulative. The first time it is bearable. The second time I am frustrated. The third time I ask myself if it is necessary. The fourth time I decide it is not. And with that, the entire value built up so far is wiped out again, with little or no future.

Killer touchpoints! Be careful! They are everywhere without anyone knowing (or even looking)! And above all, they don’t have shark fins on their backs!

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